Wednesday, July 26, 2017

Illinois State University: The founding, life, and demise of a small Midwestern College

I just finished reading Robert Allan Stevens' book, Saga of an Antebellum College: The Story of the Original Illinois State University, and can recommend it to those with an interest in the founding of denominational colleges during the 19th century.  The author expertly places ISU within the contexts of western expansion across the Midwest, Lutheran denominational interests, and the competition of other similar institutions in the state and region.

ISU's story is really the story of the founding of three institutions.  Hillsboro College operated in Hillsboro, IL from 1847-1852 and its closing coincided with a decision to found ISU as a Lutheran institution in a more promising location, the state's capitol in Springfield.  A variety of complex issues confronted ISU during its relatively brief existence and it closed in 1869 as attention turned to the founding of Carthage College in Carthage, IL.

Stevens' skills as a story teller are evident as he weaves the results of extensive research into an interesting narrative that underscores the importance of ISU.  Even though it enjoyed a relatively brief existence, a number of ISU students played important roles as adults.  Robert Todd Lincoln, son of Abraham Lincoln, and John Hay, Lincoln's private secretary, biographer and later U.S. ambassador to England and Secretary of State, were ISU students.

Lists of trustees, students, graduates, and short bibliographic sketches are included as appendices, along with references and other sources.

Friday, July 21, 2017

Closure of Comanche Nation College Announced

KSWO, the ABC affiliate in Lawton, OK reports that Comanche Nation College will close.  The 2-year, public institution enrolled just under 50 students.  It was initially chartered in 2002 and opened in 2005.
Scott Raines of The Lawton Constitution also reports on the decision by the Comanche Nation business committee in "Tribe Closing College."

If you are interested in recent trends for closures, access College Closures since 2009 in the index at the right of any College History Garden page.  There are separate tabs for non-profit and for-profit closures.  Each tab includes basic information for each institution, i.e., Carnegie Classification, sector, accrediting agency, and the IPEDS unitid.

Wednesday, July 19, 2017

Duluth Business University Announces Closure

The Minneapolis Star Tribune reports in "Duluth's oldest university closing after 126 years" that Duluth Business University will close.  The for-profit institution was founded in 1891.
A 3-minute video on the closure, "Duluth Business University to Close After 126 years," is available on Duluth's Fox21 website that includes an interview with DBU's president and owner, Jim Gessner.

If you are interested in recent trends for closures, access College Closures since 2009 in the index at the right of any College History Garden page.  There are separate tabs for non-profit and for-profit closures.  Each tab includes basic information for each institution, i.e., Carnegie Classification, sector, accrediting agency, and the IPEDS unitid.

Tuesday, July 18, 2017

West Virginia Business College Closes

Jeff Jenkins reported on July 10, 2017 for the Charleston, WV Metro News Network, "Email says WV Business College has closed."  Jenkins quotes an email from James Weir, West Virginia Business College general manager, that was sent to students.  The institution was no longer accredited and was experiencing declining enrollment.

The institution was founded in 1881 as Elliott Commercial College in Clarksburg, WV. The name change in 1911 to West Virginia Business College. A branch campus was established in Wheeling in 1989 and was later designated as the main campus. The initial branch in Clarksburg then moved to Nutter Fort, WV.

If you are interested in recent trends for closures, access College Closures since 2009 in the index at the right of any College History Garden page.  There are separate tabs for non-profit and for-profit closures.  Each tab includes basic information for each institution, i.e., Carnegie Classification, sector, accrediting agency, and the IPEDS unitid.

Solving the Mystery of St. Etheldreda's College

Derek James of the Norwich Evening News posted an article this week, "Solving the mystery of 'St. Etheldreda's College,'" where he reports on efforts to learn more about the institution. St. Etheldreda's, also known as The Norwich Diocesan Training College operated in several locations from 1839 until it was destroyed during the Blitz in 1942.
  
Keswick Hall College of Education filled a need for teacher training in the post-war period from 1948-1981 and web pages devoted to its history include a brief sketch of the Norwich training college with a number of interesting photographs.


Tuesday, July 4, 2017

Martin University Continues Unique Mission and Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Martin University in Indianapolis, IN is celebrating the 40th anniversary of its founding in 1977 with several events planned this year.  
Martin University was founded and remains focused on a mission to serve low-income, minority, and adult learners.  The original campus was located at 35th Street and College Avenue in Indianapolis. The institution then moved to its current location on North Sherman Drive in the Martindale-Brightwood neighborhood in 1987 where it occupied buildings once used by St. Francis de Sales Catholic Church and Elementary School.

The curriculum has expanded over time and Martin U will open a School of Education this fall with a unique focus on preparing teachers for schools in urban neighborhoods,

Monday, July 3, 2017

Southwest Wisconsin Technical College Celebrates 50th Anniversary

Southwest Wisconsin Technical College in Fennimore, WI is celebrating the 50th anniversary of its founding in 1967.  The institution was initially known as the Southwest Wisconsin Vocational-Technical Institute.  You can visit Southwest Tech's web pages to see a brief historical sketch or scan the 50th anniversary magazine.